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Thread: How to setup wireless in a large area?

  1. #1
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    Exclamation How to setup wireless in a large area?

    I've setup wired networks before but I have this task I'm trying to accomplish:

    Basically, I'm trying to setup wireless connectivity in an office area. It's quite big with 2 2 storey buildings and would require 10-15 routers if I put one every 50 meters. The goal is to have a WLAN with WAN access in every office.

    So, I was planning on hard-wiring a router, say ROUTER0 to the WAN modem then put another router (ROUTER1) in repeater mode 50 meters away until ROUTERn. I will then have 1 modem that connects to WAN, 1 router that connects to the WAN modem and repeaters. However, I'm a little confused. The question is, can a repeater be connected to another repeater? For example, ROUTER1 is a repeater; can ROUTER2 connect to ROUTER1 then ROUTER3 connects to ROUTER2 and so on until there's wireless everywhere?

    I've been reading around and I've noticed many articles suggesting Access Points over Repeaters. But, I don't fully understand this. I'd appreciate some clarifications.

    So, how would I go about setting up this wireless network?

  2. #2
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    Each repeater cuts in 1/2. So after the 3rd or 4th repeater....wow, you'd be a dial up speeds.

    The way to do larger networks that require multiple access points...is to use access points that are designed to be centrally managed ...these are business grade access points. Don't go trying to make a bubblegum and duct tape wireless setup out of a bunch of home grade units. Leave repeaters for little home networks.

    Some of my preferred hardware for larger wireless deployments....HP ProCurve MSP units. It's pricey..yes...you'll be started with at least 4 grand in hardware just to get 3-4 access points out...but it's economical if you have a network large enough to use at least a dozen or more. Rock solid units.

    If you're on a smaller budget, take a look at Ubiquity Unifi products...
    http://www.ubnt.com/unifi
    I've done some networks with those...you install the management software on a server or PC ..and control them from there. Less than a hundred bucks per AP....and they work quite well.
    MORNING WOOD Lumber Company
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by YeOldeStonecat View Post
    Each repeater cuts in 1/2. So after the 3rd or 4th repeater....wow, you'd be a dial up speeds.

    The way to do larger networks that require multiple access points...is to use access points that are designed to be centrally managed ...these are business grade access points. Don't go trying to make a bubblegum and duct tape wireless setup out of a bunch of home grade units. Leave repeaters for little home networks.

    Some of my preferred hardware for larger wireless deployments....HP ProCurve MSP units. It's pricey..yes...you'll be started with at least 4 grand in hardware just to get 3-4 access points out...but it's economical if you have a network large enough to use at least a dozen or more. Rock solid units.

    If you're on a smaller budget, take a look at Ubiquity Unifi products...
    http://www.ubnt.com/unifi
    I've done some networks with those...you install the management software on a server or PC ..and control them from there. Less than a hundred bucks per AP....and they work quite well.
    The HP Procurves are too much for us right now, we don't have that kind of budget. I checked out the Ubiquity Unify, looks really good. I can get 1 for around $70 which is pretty good. The specs look really good as well-up to 300Mbps over 500ft.

    So, tell me if I got this one right. I connect AP0 to my WAN modem via Ethernet. Then, I put another AP1 about 350ft away that will get connectivity from AP0, then APn will get connectivity from the AP that precedes it. Is that right?

  4. #4
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    You connect the APs to your network switch....not your "modem". Unless you mean a "router" which has a bunch of LAN ports.

    They each get connectivity from your network switch, not from each other. Each AP is independent. AP0 gets connectivity from the switch. AP1 gets connectivity from the switch. AP2 gets connectivity from the switch..etc etc. Not from each other. Discard the idea of "repeaters"...you don't want that.
    MORNING WOOD Lumber Company
    Guinness for Strength!!!

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