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Thread: force wireless n win7

  1. #1
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    force wireless n win7

    i have a mixed g/n network . my raylink usb card is connecting to the g network. I need to change that.
    I found this http://www.sunshinenetworks.com.au/h...n-windows.html
    I did what it said . change all the 'wirelessmode' values to 6. didnt work.

    another -1 for windows..

    any help would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    It's controlled by your wireless access point...I'm guessing you have a single radio access point. It will drop to 54 meg mode if it has a G wireless client connected. If no G clients, it will run at N speeds..but as soon as you connect a G client it will drop its speed to G speeds.
    If you want to connect both G and N clients to your access point...and you want your N clients to run at N speeds...you need a dual radio access point that will basically run both modes at once.

    Or...upgrade your old G wireless clients with N adapters, so that you no longer have any G clients.
    MORNING WOOD Lumber Company
    Guinness for Strength!!!

  3. #3
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    are you sure? whats the point of a mixed network then? also my access point is dual signal AND i tried turning off the computer that was using only g.
    and my router can run two networks , one for guests which it so happens WILL run n while it only sees the privet network as g.
    Last edited by issicus; 09-04-11 at 07:00 PM.

  4. #4
    Moderator YeOldeStonecat's Avatar
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    Most wireless access points/routers will support multiple types of wireless speeds...for example, the majority of common single radio APs will support B/G/N..which runs on 2.4 frequency. However..to be backwards compatible, they MUST slow down to the slowest client that is connecting. Meaning...say you have a wireless SSID..and 10 wireless N clients. It will run at N speeds for all 10. Now say you bring in an older laptop that has just a G card....this access point will now slow down to G speeds to accommodate it. This means that the other 10 N clients are forced to drop down to G speeds (54 megs) also. Now say you bring in an even older laptop..one that has an ancient B wireless card. The access point will drop down to B speeds (11 megs) to accommodate it. This means the G laptop, as well as the other 10 N clients, also must suffer and follow along with B speeds...because the single radio access point has to run that way.

    This has nothing to do with an APs ability to run multiple SSIDs...if it's single radio...it's single radio, and it has to run that way by design.

    Now...dual radio APs have the ability to allow N clients to always run at N speeds, because what they can do is run another SSID for the legacy clients (G and B). So this dual radio AP, you setup an SSID for N clients, and you setup another SSID on the second radio for your legacy clients..the G and B clients. This way, the first radio...for your N clients, only runs for N clients..and it doesn't have to kick down to a slower speed for your legacy clients. Since it only has N clients connected to it. Think of it as having 2x separate APs...just, in one box.

    This is the way wireless access points work, you're forced to follow how they work. Your wireless clients have to follow the way they work. Nothing you do to your operating system on your clients can change this.

    Another option you have, if you don't want to spend the money on a dual radio AP, is if you have an older G AP laying around..utilize it. This is how I have my home setup. I have 2x wireless routers...both reconfigured to run as access points behind my linux firewall. On is a wrt150n that runs my N wireless, and another is an older G access point that runs a G wireless network for our phones and one of our older laptops. Prior to setting up that second G wireless AP, if I was home alone...my laptop would be the only wireless client on, and it would run at N speeds. But soon as my wife gets home with her Droid phone, or my daughter fired up her older laptop...since they are G wireless...my AP would drop down to G speeds to accommodate those. And I'd experience the slower speeds. So that's why I dusted off my older G wireless router and employed that...so keep their slower G hardware from slowing down my N network.
    MORNING WOOD Lumber Company
    Guinness for Strength!!!

  5. #5
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    so why is one of my ssids n and the other g?

  6. #6
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    huh.. i figured it out. I changed it to AES instead of TKIP. idk why that worked ...

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