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Thread: Re: Tor and WiFi

  1. #1
    Ari
    Guest

    Re: Tor and WiFi

    On Tue, 23 Dec 2008 06:55:44 -0500, BuckMulligan wrote:

    > Is it possible to run Tor on a public WiFi access point? Seems to me not
    > since you don't have access to the DIR and OR ports.


    Do you intend to pull the wireless data into your PC and onion route it?
    --
    Meet Ari!
    http://tr.im/1fa3

  2. #2
    Chrisjoy
    Guest

    Re: Tor and WiFi

    On Dec 23, 11:20*pm, Ari <DROPTheJooseIsLo...@gmail.comCAPITALLETTERS>
    wrote:
    > On Tue, 23 Dec 2008 06:55:44 -0500, BuckMulligan wrote:
    > > Is it possible to run Tor on a public WiFi access point? Seems to me not
    > > since you don't have access to the DIR and OR ports.


    Short answer, YES. All though I doubt Tor needs portforwarding to be
    useful. It may not be able to be an input node, but it can indeed be
    in between and being an output node if the protocol allows nodes to
    connect to both ends.. To get it to also being an input node, you
    would need to fool the NAT(s) in the hotspot AP (and possible the
    modem) into forwarding ports for any outside IP. This is a simple task
    if it's not a symetric NAT or address restricted NAT (1). (Most
    embedded NAT's I've seen is Port restricted NATs or Open Cone, and
    they will be easily fooled into forwarding packets to your Tor box,
    regardless what IP they are comming from as long as the port is
    correct. Same for full cone NAT, but they are rare. You only need help
    from a third party server directly connected to the net, to tell what
    port has been opened on the public address, and this info you forward
    to Tor, and Tor will guide new clients to use this port to use your
    Tor as an input node. You would probably need to test each hotspot to
    find out what NAT it is using, because such info may not be available
    anywhere. To make this work you need superstructure on top of Tor,
    which fool NAT into forwarding, and if it works (which you're testing
    with your third party server), start Tor with full functionality, and
    if not, start Tor as connecting node only. Your structure should also
    make sure there goes packets over the NAT port, to keep it alive. As
    we know hotspots often are on a a-symetric line, I think it should be
    some kind of traffic limit so that it doesn't destroy the line. A Tor
    node need to use exactly the same amount of bandwidth inbound as
    outbound. If you're a decent guy you only tap 10% of the bandwidth,
    when there is other traffic, and this will scream for bandwidth
    measurements in your striucture as well.

    (1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network...ss_translation

  3. #3
    BuckMulligan
    Guest

    Re: Tor and WiFi

    In article <giro17$j44$1@news.tornevall.net>,
    DROPTheJooseIsLoose@gmail.comCAPITALLETTERS says...
    >
    >
    >On Tue, 23 Dec 2008 06:55:44 -0500, BuckMulligan wrote:
    >
    >> Is it possible to run Tor on a public WiFi access point? Seems to me not
    >> since you don't have access to the DIR and OR ports.

    >
    >Do you intend to pull the wireless data into your PC and onion route it?
    >--
    >Meet Ari!
    >http://tr.im/1fa3


    No. Just curious. I have no particular reason to and it looks very
    complicated.


  4. #4
    BuckMulligan
    Guest

    Re: Tor and WiFi

    In article
    <972f1121-d9e2-4208-b4db-d766c03306b5@w24g2000prd.googlegroups.com>,
    ultralibertarianer@gmail.com says...
    >
    >
    >On Dec 23, 11:20*pm, Ari <DROPTheJooseIsLo...@gmail.comCAPITALLETTERS>
    >wrote:
    >> On Tue, 23 Dec 2008 06:55:44 -0500, BuckMulligan wrote:
    >> > Is it possible to run Tor on a public WiFi access point? Seems to me not
    >> > since you don't have access to the DIR and OR ports.

    >
    >Short answer, YES. All though I doubt Tor needs portforwarding to be
    >useful. It may not be able to be an input node, but it can indeed be
    >in between and being an output node if the protocol allows nodes to
    >connect to both ends.. To get it to also being an input node, you
    >would need to fool the NAT(s) in the hotspot AP (and possible the
    >modem) into forwarding ports for any outside IP. This is a simple task
    >if it's not a symetric NAT or address restricted NAT (1). (Most
    >embedded NAT's I've seen is Port restricted NATs or Open Cone, and
    >they will be easily fooled into forwarding packets to your Tor box,
    >regardless what IP they are comming from as long as the port is
    >correct. Same for full cone NAT, but they are rare. You only need help
    >from a third party server directly connected to the net, to tell what
    >port has been opened on the public address, and this info you forward
    >to Tor, and Tor will guide new clients to use this port to use your
    >Tor as an input node. You would probably need to test each hotspot to
    >find out what NAT it is using, because such info may not be available
    >anywhere. To make this work you need superstructure on top of Tor,
    >which fool NAT into forwarding, and if it works (which you're testing
    >with your third party server), start Tor with full functionality, and
    >if not, start Tor as connecting node only. Your structure should also
    >make sure there goes packets over the NAT port, to keep it alive. As
    >we know hotspots often are on a a-symetric line, I think it should be
    >some kind of traffic limit so that it doesn't destroy the line. A Tor
    >node need to use exactly the same amount of bandwidth inbound as
    >outbound. If you're a decent guy you only tap 10% of the bandwidth,
    >when there is other traffic, and this will scream for bandwidth
    >measurements in your striucture as well.
    >
    >(1) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network...ss_translation


    Many thanks for your detailed response.


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