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Thread: Acceptable signal strength?

  1. #1
    frank
    Guest

    Acceptable signal strength?

    Hi,

    I seem to have periodic outages with Comcast Internet. I looked at the
    signal level while it was happening. Are the following vlaues alarming?

    SNR: 26.7dB
    Power level: 52.9dBmV
    Received signal strenghtl: -19.5 dBmV



  2. #2
    $Bill
    Guest

    Re: Acceptable signal strength?

    frank wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > I seem to have periodic outages with Comcast Internet. I looked at the
    > signal level while it was happening. Are the following vlaues alarming?
    >
    > SNR: 26.7dB


    Low - typically in the 30-40 dB range (also depends on chipset QPSK/QAM)

    > Power level: 52.9dBmV


    High - shouting a bit.

    > Received signal strenghtl: -19.5 dBmV


    Low - should normally be in the -15 to +15 range (-12 to +12 better - 0 optimal)

    I'd have them make a call.



  3. #3
    Todd H.
    Guest

    Re: Acceptable signal strength?

    "frank" <frank@nospam.com> writes:

    > Hi,
    >
    > I seem to have periodic outages with Comcast Internet. I looked at the
    > signal level while it was happening. Are the following vlaues alarming?
    >
    > SNR: 26.7dB
    > Power level: 52.9dBmV
    > Received signal strenghtl: -19.5 dBmV



    Your upstream power level is pretty high. I generally start seeing
    flakey performance and packet loss issues when mine's been over 50.
    Mine's at 45dBmV right now.

    Your SNR seems a little low. Mine's at 34dB fwiw.

    Your received signal strength seems low as well. Mine's at -8dBmV
    right now.


    Try this at the DOS prompt or Terminal prompt:

    ping -t www.google.com


    Let it run for a minute or so and hit Ctrl-c.

    Look at the (% loss) number towards the end. I bet yours it pretty
    substantial. If you mention this packet loss number to the customer
    service agent sometimes it can help your case to get a technician out
    there to look at the lines. It can be as simple as a cable bent in
    too tight an angle in the wall or on the floor, or a connection that
    needed to be taken apart and put back together, or replacing a
    standard splitter with a directional coupler, or reterminating some
    cables with new ends, or several other things that might restore
    things to happiness.

    But overall, yeah, your signal is iffy enough and your results with it
    inconsistent enough that you shouldn't have to live with it. Make em
    roll a truck for ya.


    Best Regards,
    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/

  4. #4
    Todd H.
    Guest

    Re: Acceptable signal strength?

    comphelp@toddh.net (Todd H.) writes:

    > "frank" <frank@nospam.com> writes:
    >
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> I seem to have periodic outages with Comcast Internet. I looked at the
    >> signal level while it was happening. Are the following vlaues alarming?
    >>
    >> SNR: 26.7dB
    >> Power level: 52.9dBmV
    >> Received signal strenghtl: -19.5 dBmV

    >
    >
    > Your upstream power level is pretty high. I generally start seeing
    > flakey performance and packet loss issues when mine's been over 50.
    > Mine's at 45dBmV right now.
    >
    > Your SNR seems a little low. Mine's at 34dB fwiw.
    >
    > Your received signal strength seems low as well. Mine's at -8dBmV
    > right now.
    >
    >
    > Try this at the DOS prompt or Terminal prompt:
    >
    > ping -t www.google.com
    >
    >
    > Let it run for a minute or so and hit Ctrl-c.
    >
    > Look at the (% loss) number towards the end. I bet yours it pretty
    > substantial.


    Oh, I forgot to mention this loss number should be 0% ... maybe 1%
    tops. Any more than that, life really begins to suck. I'd suspect
    with your numbers you might be seeing a handful of percent loss, and I
    bet when it rains or when it's humid you might be having more problems
    than when it's dry out?


    If you mention this packet loss number to the customer
    > service agent sometimes it can help your case to get a technician out
    > there to look at the lines. It can be as simple as a cable bent in
    > too tight an angle in the wall or on the floor, or a connection that
    > needed to be taken apart and put back together, or replacing a
    > standard splitter with a directional coupler, or reterminating some
    > cables with new ends, or several other things that might restore
    > things to happiness.
    >
    > But overall, yeah, your signal is iffy enough and your results with it
    > inconsistent enough that you shouldn't have to live with it. Make em
    > roll a truck for ya.
    >
    >
    > Best Regards,
    > --
    > Todd H.
    > http://www.toddh.net/


    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/

  5. #5
    frank
    Guest

    Re: Acceptable signal strength?

    Hi,

    Currently (with the same signal numbers) my Internet connection seems to
    work fine. I did the ping-> resulted in 0% errors.
    I noticed a bit error number in my modem: it is 0.028%

    "Todd H." <comphelp@toddh.net> wrote in message
    news:84wsjwpj8r@news.giganews.com...
    > comphelp@toddh.net (Todd H.) writes:
    >
    >> "frank" <frank@nospam.com> writes:
    >>
    >>> Hi,
    >>>
    >>> I seem to have periodic outages with Comcast Internet. I looked at the
    >>> signal level while it was happening. Are the following vlaues alarming?
    >>>
    >>> SNR: 26.7dB
    >>> Power level: 52.9dBmV
    >>> Received signal strenghtl: -19.5 dBmV

    >>
    >>
    >> Your upstream power level is pretty high. I generally start seeing
    >> flakey performance and packet loss issues when mine's been over 50.
    >> Mine's at 45dBmV right now.
    >>
    >> Your SNR seems a little low. Mine's at 34dB fwiw.
    >>
    >> Your received signal strength seems low as well. Mine's at -8dBmV
    >> right now.
    >>
    >>
    >> Try this at the DOS prompt or Terminal prompt:
    >>
    >> ping -t www.google.com
    >>
    >>
    >> Let it run for a minute or so and hit Ctrl-c.
    >>
    >> Look at the (% loss) number towards the end. I bet yours it pretty
    >> substantial.

    >
    > Oh, I forgot to mention this loss number should be 0% ... maybe 1%
    > tops. Any more than that, life really begins to suck. I'd suspect
    > with your numbers you might be seeing a handful of percent loss, and I
    > bet when it rains or when it's humid you might be having more problems
    > than when it's dry out?
    >
    >
    > If you mention this packet loss number to the customer
    >> service agent sometimes it can help your case to get a technician out
    >> there to look at the lines. It can be as simple as a cable bent in
    >> too tight an angle in the wall or on the floor, or a connection that
    >> needed to be taken apart and put back together, or replacing a
    >> standard splitter with a directional coupler, or reterminating some
    >> cables with new ends, or several other things that might restore
    >> things to happiness.
    >>
    >> But overall, yeah, your signal is iffy enough and your results with it
    >> inconsistent enough that you shouldn't have to live with it. Make em
    >> roll a truck for ya.
    >>
    >>
    >> Best Regards,
    >> --
    >> Todd H.
    >> http://www.toddh.net/

    >
    > --
    > Todd H.
    > http://www.toddh.net/




  6. #6
    Todd H.
    Guest

    Re: Acceptable signal strength?

    "frank" <frank@nospam.com> writes:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Currently (with the same signal numbers) my Internet connection seems to
    > work fine. I did the ping-> resulted in 0% errors.
    > I noticed a bit error number in my modem: it is 0.028%



    Groovy. You may just be on a bit of a hairy edge. Next time your
    connection appears to get flakey, repeat the ping test. I know I've
    had experiences in the past where I'd have intermittent degradations
    due to weather and such, and things would go to crap with very subtle
    changes in the signal numbers.

    For example, at 52dBmV upstream, life could be okay on a dry day,
    lousy on a wet day.

    I'd wait for a crappy day to call the cable company so they can have
    something specific like packet loss to hang their hat on for a
    justification for a truck roll.

    Good luck!

    --
    Todd H.
    http://www.toddh.net/

  7. #7
    $Bill
    Guest

    Re: Acceptable signal strength?

    frank wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > Currently (with the same signal numbers) my Internet connection seems to
    > work fine. I did the ping-> resulted in 0% errors.
    > I noticed a bit error number in my modem: it is 0.028%


    Just for reference, what are your advertised up/down speeds (should be
    available where your Tx/Rx/SNR were) ?

    And what do you get from a speedtest ?

    http://www.broadbandreports.com/speedtest
    http://speedtest.net/

    Eg: My advertised is 6144/512 (D/L from modem) and right now I'm getting
    5635/299 from broadbandreports. And my Tx/Rx/SNR:
    Tx Power 50.0 dBmV (slightly on the high side)
    Rx Power -4.1 dBmV (good)
    Downstream SNR 36.3 dB (good)

  8. #8
    frank
    Guest

    Re: Acceptable signal strength?

    I have the feeling there are two issues:
    1.) the signal
    2.) some other issue on the network when my connectivity is bad.

    It is difficult to explain 2.) to the support since it happens only so
    often.

    BTW: my speedtest.net numbers: 6302/989 (with similar signal strenght)

    "$Bill" <news@SPAMOLAtodbe.com> wrote in message
    news:g503kk$338$1@registered.motzarella.org...
    > frank wrote:
    >> Hi,
    >>
    >> Currently (with the same signal numbers) my Internet connection seems to
    >> work fine. I did the ping-> resulted in 0% errors.
    >> I noticed a bit error number in my modem: it is 0.028%

    >
    > Just for reference, what are your advertised up/down speeds (should be
    > available where your Tx/Rx/SNR were) ?
    >
    > And what do you get from a speedtest ?
    >
    > http://www.broadbandreports.com/speedtest
    > http://speedtest.net/
    >
    > Eg: My advertised is 6144/512 (D/L from modem) and right now I'm getting
    > 5635/299 from broadbandreports. And my Tx/Rx/SNR:
    > Tx Power 50.0 dBmV (slightly on the high side)
    > Rx Power -4.1 dBmV (good)
    > Downstream SNR 36.3 dB (good)




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