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Thread: splitters - what mhz range do I need?

  1. #1
    purecomedy
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    Post splitters - what mhz range do I need?

    If I want to add a splitter so I can add a tv onto the cable line where my cable modem is operating does anyone know what frequency range that the splitter must be able to handle?

    I notice that the common splitters at the store seem to support 5 to 900Mhz....does 900Mhz cut off some of the bandwidth for cable modems or is it okay?

  2. #2
    wee96
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    Post

    Get a 1000mhz splitter (dont use radio shack, get a Regal if you can).

  3. #3
    purecomedy
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    Post

    who sells Regal brand stuff?


  4. #4
    messiah
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    Post

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by wee96:
    Get a 1000mhz splitter (dont use radio shack, get a Regal if you can).</font>
    Would you suggest the same for a Sattelite coax?(Directv) I found 2 compatible splitters: 900mhz, and 2500mhz @ frys.

  5. #5
    IndyOST
    Guest

    Exclamation

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by purecomedy:
    I notice that the common splitters at the store seem to support 5 to 900Mhz....does 900Mhz cut off some of the bandwidth for cable modems or is it okay?</font>
    Most cable modems operate on a pair of frequencies, one being for the upstream (upload) and one being for the downstream (download). Usually, in dealing with the system that I currently work, the downstream frequency sits at about 600 Mhz and the upstream sits right around 30 Mhz. Other systems use different frequencies, but generally stay in the 500 - 800 Mhz range for the downstream. So you definitely want to use (in my opinion) at least a 1000 Mhz splitter...like wee96 stated, if you can get a regal, that would be the best (it's what we use in Indy).
    Oh, and whatever you do, don't put your signal through something like an archer/radio shack signal amplifier...it'll kill your upstream signal in a heartbeat...

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  6. #6
    purecomedy
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    Post

    I think you'd get a good chuckle out of my setup. I've got 2 splitters on 1 line to accomodate a tv, tv tuner card and a cable modem. One the first splitter I also have an amplifier for my tv only (I did already hear somewhere that putting an amplifier in the path of a cable modem is a no-no unless it's a really really expensive one).

    The cable leading to the other room for my computer is pretty long and is only RG-59. When I move I'm gonna go to RG-6 for sure and hopefully can change things around a bit since I expect to have more than just 1 incoming cable input.

    I noticed when the cable guy game to install my cable modem that he put new ends on 1 or 2 of my cables. Do the ends really matter a lot?

  7. #7
    messiah
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    Post

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by messiah:
    Would you suggest the same for a Sattelite coax?(Directv) I found 2 compatible splitters: 900mhz, and 2500mhz @ frys. </font>
    ^

  8. #8
    MtCableman
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    Post

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by purecomedy:
    The cable leading to the other room for my computer is pretty long and is only RG-59. When I move I'm gonna go to RG-6 for sure and hopefully can change things around a bit since I expect to have more than just 1 incoming cable input.

    I noticed when the cable guy game to install my cable modem that he put new ends on 1 or 2 of my cables. Do the ends really matter a lot?
    </font>
    Changing the RG59 to a RG6 will improve your signal by 1db every 100 feet. So look and see how long it really is. Quality of the shield can really make the difference.

    Changing the ends of the cable insure that the connection is solid. Poor connections can cause some real problems, especially for the return frequencies. Loose connections can cause noise which will affect the data stream.




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  9. #9
    purecomedy
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    It's about 50 feet long so I guess .5db isn't a big deal. Some of the end connections I think are a bit messed up....the worst of which being the wall connection. I noticed one time I was dusting the wall plate and when I went into the other room the light on my cable modem was blinking!

    I've actually looked at a couple of stores for the connectors that the cable guy used but I didn't see anything that looked the same. I wish I had a digital camera so I could show what they look like.

    Oh well, I'm not going to get too concerned here. In the new place I'm moving to in a few months I'm just gonna make sure that I use RG-6 everywhere. Hopefully by then I'll learn what ends are best and I'll just buy a spool of RG-6 cable and make all my own wires (probably cheaper to do this anyways).

  10. #10
    Kip Patterson
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    Post

    The wire and connectors are cheap - but the crimper is breathtaking. My RG-59 crimper, for BNC (remember Arcnet? You're too young) was $45, and good crimpers for F connectors are around $120.

    Then there is the problem of finding connectors matched to the crimper.

  11. #11
    MtCableman
    Guest

    Post

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Kip Patterson:
    The wire and connectors are cheap - but the crimper is breathtaking. My RG-59 crimper, for BNC (remember Arcnet? You're too young) was $45, and good crimpers for F connectors are around $120.

    Then there is the problem of finding connectors matched to the crimper.
    </font>
    Kip is right.....You need the right tool for the job. Don't try the "Tim the Toolman Taylor" job by using a pair of pliers to "crimp" the connector on. Get the right tool or pay someone to do it right.



    ------------------
    Closed course and Professional user.
    Don't try this at Home!

  12. #12
    purecomedy
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    Post

    Okay this is all very interesting about the intricacies of crimping, finding proper ends and all the rest. I didn't think it would be too hard...more of a 1 size fits all kind of deal.

    My main idea here was to cut sizes of cable to the length needed...I find buying a 50 foot cable for a 30 foot job kinda sucks. After these posts I'm gonna just live with it I guess or else try to borrow the crimper + ends from somebody that knows what they are doing.

    Thanks for the info guys.

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