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Thread: Multiple IP addresses with Cable Router

  1. #1

    Post Multiple IP addresses with Cable Router

    Okay, no one answered my previous question Does anyone know of any good cable routers that support multiple IP addresses on the WAN interface (similar to Windows NT where you can assign multiple IP addresses to the same NIC?), so here's another...

    If I stick a hub between my cable modem and the cable router, can I use multiple routers for multiple IP addresses. My problem is I have 2 static IP addresses through my cable company and I need both IP's. Is there any other alternative?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    your post is a bit confusing . you have 2 ip addresses from your cable company correct?
    How many computers total are you trying to connect total through that single modem?
    if you r going to use a router is there some specific need you have to still have 2 ip addresses?
    if you got a hub and then had 2 routers behind the hub on your lan side then you should be able to have each router pick up the ip address either by dhcp with authentication from a dhcp client or the MAC address of the network interface that you have in file with your isp (you should be able to mask the MAC from your old network interface into most routers)
    the above setup would probably work but to use 2 routers with multiple computers on each router then going through a hub to the modem would probably be a bad set up
    why? because a hub is a device that only broadcast on the lan side so it would be flooding each router on your lan side with the packets for the other router and a hub does not help to avoid collisions of packets that the routers would be trying to up load through it
    i am no network expert but i think you would need to use a switch instead of a hub since it would route packets for each ip to its specific router on your lan and would detect collisions on the upstream

    hope this helps goodday ya'll

    [ 05-01-2001: Message edited by: rodrod5 ]

  3. #3
    SG Enthusiast Storm90's Avatar
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    Your easiest way would be to drop the seconed Ip and buy a router with a switch already in it. It will give you the best Performance. Just look around and do price checks. You will be able to find one for about 150.00 to 200.00. Depending on what you want to spend. Plus in the long run it will save, From spending the extra money on the extra IP. GoodLuck
    Have A Nice Day!!!!!!!!!

  4. #4

    Cool

    Okay, maybe i need to explain myself in more detail. I have 2 domain names (with 2 different IP's) that point to the same server on my internal network. With Win NT I can setup those 2 IP's on the same NIC. If I install a cable router (from what I've seen out there) they are only capable of assigning 1 IP on the WAN side. I need to have both IP's forwarded to my internal network because they are resolved to different domain names. I was thinking if I stick a hub in between the cable modem and the 2 cable routers I could assign 1 IP to each of the routers and then stick another hub between the 2 cable routers and my internal network. Is this a good or bad idea?

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    it would work but you would probably need a switch not a hub to avoid the above mentioned problems
    also on your lan side of each of your 2 routers you should not need a hub most routers should have several ports on them to link to a pc
    if the router supported .0-.255 ip addresses and only had 4 lan side ports then you would need hubs and switches on your lan side to support those internal ip address

    [ 05-01-2001: Message edited by: rodrod5 ]

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    Best way I know of to handle that is to get a second NIC and assign a public address to each. Get a small switch or hub to connect modem to host. Skip the router and get a good software firewall. You could always build your own firewall for free on a linux or *bsd box, with multihoming on both LAN and WAN sides...

    Most of the routers (downstream from the enterprise market) are focused on sharig a single connecting among multiple machines, thereby saving money. You want to do the opposite and so it will be tough finding an affordable packaged solution. Especially if you are hosting public services.

    Have fun,
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  7. #7

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    So you're saying that I should use Switches on both sides? Thanks for replying

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    how many computers are you going to put on the lan side of each router??

  9. #9

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    There is only going to be a couple servers and 1 desktop.

  10. #10

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    Keep in mind that I would like both routers connected to the same switch/hub on the LAN side. I am not even sure if this possible or a good idea.

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    Is one of the public ips going to be shared among different machines or are we talking about a single, multihomed server hosting two websites?
    anything is possible - nothing is free


    Quote Originally Posted by Blisster
    It *would* be brokeback bay if I in fact went and hung out with Skye and co (did I mention he is teh hotness?)

  12. #12

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    Yes, my current setup is 1 multi-homed server with 2 NICS (1 for Internet, 1 for LAN). The Internet NIC is hosting 2 web sites with 2 different IP's. I would like to use a cable router to separate my network from the Internet but I can't seem one that will allow multiple IP addresses.

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    you need at least a hub probably a switch after the modem then the router should pic up the ip addresses from the modem no problem
    a hub is like a phone splitter if 2 people pick up the phone then they will have a "collision" and hear each other

    a switch can send only the traffic needed to each router and not broadcast it to both routers like a hub would

    then on your lan side after the routers the routers should have more than 1 port to hook a computer or server into so if 2 routers each probably have 4 ports so you could have 8 computers or servers total

  14. #14

    Smile

    Thanks rodrod5 and cyberskye for the info. I wish someone would make a cable router that supported multiple IP's. This would make it so much easier.

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    SG Enthusiast twwabw's Avatar
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    Use a managed switch, and set up VLANs. You can then physically seperate connections, and divert to appropriate NIC.

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    SG DC Team Member lance-tek's Avatar
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    I can only say one thing

    SyGate


    I use it as opposed to routers and hubs for small networks. It is cheap and easy to use. and It does allow IP signing.

    Hope you get it all solved
    A mistake does not become an error until one refuses to correct it

    Folding for the future

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