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View Full Version : what do YOU use to thicken up chili ?



Dan
11-06-07, 06:37 PM
I like corn starch,

what else is good to use,what is your secret ?


I have been making chili in the crock pot since 12 today

burple
11-06-07, 06:54 PM
I hear corn starch is good. I also hear masa is good. But I personally do not like my chili thick. I like it watery so I can soak it up with crackers. ummmm

MadDoctor
11-06-07, 06:56 PM
I hear corn starch is good. I also hear masa is good. But I personally do not like my chili thick. I like it watery so I can soak it up with crackers. ummmm

That said... put some crackers in a blender and add to chili. Thick as you like.

Bastid
11-06-07, 07:33 PM
I usually let it cook for a few hours on the stove so the water will evaporate... well, i dont use water but thats another story ;)

BTW... ive tried masa, but i hated it... made the chili taste like corn... was nasty.

trogers
11-06-07, 07:40 PM
Slice up 6 shallots (very small onions).

Heat up a table spoon of olive oil and stir fry the sliced shallots under low heat till fragrant.

Add in your chilli and stir fry the mix for 3 mins. Add salt and sugar to taste.

koldchillah
11-06-07, 07:45 PM
What a coincidence, I just started a pot of chili myself.

I use a little bit of shredded sharp cheddar and saltine cracker crumbs, but I only add that stuff for the last 15 minutes of cooking or so. Gotta stir the cheese in good until it's no longer thick enough to stick to the spoon but yet adds to the overall thickness of the chilli just a bit. The saltine crumbs do the most thickening.

I do crockpot chilli sometimes, but tonight I opted for the 1-hr stove method.

Can't wait till it's done.. It's making the house smell delicious. :)

Randy
11-06-07, 09:24 PM
tomato paste

David
11-06-07, 10:50 PM
tomato paste

Ditto!

You can use arrowroot power or even a roux.

suncrafter
11-07-07, 01:59 AM
Try cooking it with the lid off. The more steam that escapes the less watery the chili will be. :thumb:

YeOldeStonecat
11-07-07, 05:57 AM
Cornmeal...browned on a sheet in the oven....and time...a good pot of texas red style chile is a full day affair in the kitchen.

Also the crunchy leftovers from rendering pork rind fat...put in the blender..made into a paste.

TonyT
11-07-07, 07:22 AM
I've never ever added anything to thicken chili.
To ensure thick chili:
1. use canned beans and use the liquid in the cans.
2. add can of tomatoes (crused by hand) or paste or puree.
3. bring to rolling boil (no lid)
4. simmer on low heat w/ lid ajar to allow steam to escape.

For any stews like this or even soups, the sequence is:
1. brown meats in pot.
2. add firmest veggies first (peppers, celery, etc).
3. add other veggies.
4. add tomatoes (or paste or puree) & cook until acids "flatten".
5. add main ingredient (beans as in chili).

YeOldeStonecat
11-07-07, 07:27 AM
Dan..since I know you're into various peppers......and love taking the time to cook things the old slow way...seriously, check out Chef Pauls "Texas Red Chile" recipe on page 2 of the SG Cookbook thread...
http://forums.speedguide.net/showthread.php?t=101784&page=2&highlight=cookbook

You're using real chunks of sirloin...not ground meat. And no beans. Tis the best chile recipe I've ever come across.

Dan
11-07-07, 09:13 AM
Dan..since I know you're into various peppers......and love taking the time to cook things the old slow way...seriously, check out Chef Pauls "Texas Red Chile" recipe on page 2 of the SG Cookbook thread...
http://forums.speedguide.net/showthread.php?t=101784&page=2&highlight=cookbook

You're using real chunks of sirloin...not ground meat. And no beans. Tis the best chile recipe I've ever come across.


well,gotta have beens,

but I love the diced rib-eye ,,,mmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

and thanks,I copied that texas red chile recipe,looks good.

Roody
11-07-07, 09:27 AM
My church is having a Chili cook-off this saturday. Good thing it's outside. http://www.tkzm.net/images/smilies/fart.gif

Ken
11-07-07, 12:39 PM
:insert MadDocs tale of the Texas Chile Cook off, then run, far and fast: :D

MadDoctor
11-07-07, 12:45 PM
/lurking/

/farting/

Ken
11-07-07, 12:47 PM
http://forums.speedguide.net/showthread.php?s=&postid=1649030#post1649030

:D

Roody
11-07-07, 12:58 PM
/lurking/

/farting/

I guess you aren't sheepish about farting eh? :D

De Plano
11-07-07, 01:20 PM
It is not chili, but for the last batch of soup we made we boiled sweet potatoes, regular potatoes, and some other veggies and then blended those up. When we put them back in the soup it made it sort of chowdery without using dairy

triniwasp
11-07-07, 01:35 PM
Try cooking it with the lid off. The more steam that escapes the less watery the chili will be. :thumb:

:nod:


I've never ever added anything to thicken chili.
To ensure thick chili:
1. use canned beans and use the liquid in the cans.
2. add can of tomatoes (crused by hand) or paste or puree.
3. bring to rolling boil :nope:
4. simmer on low heat w/ lid ajar to allow steam to escape.



:nod:

YeOldeStonecat
11-07-07, 02:25 PM
I use ......

I don't want to know! :wth:

cadjak
05-13-08, 02:40 PM
I don't thicken my chili either. It doesn't come out thin, so I figure it doesn't need it. Real Chili does not have beans in it. Nothing wrong with adding them, but there is so little I can be arrogant about, I've chosen to be a chili snob. For me, my chili relies on great spices. I've used a little ground coffee, roasted ground sesame seeds. I will grind most of my own spices and play with the balance. Cooking is a sort of meditation. Ya gotta trust in the force. ;)

Gixxer
05-13-08, 02:56 PM
tomato paste ... a little more hamburger.

MadDoctor
05-13-08, 03:20 PM
Ya gotta trust in the force. ;)

When Ken finishes a big helping of chili... the "force" is something to fear!!!!!!

Gixxer
05-13-08, 03:25 PM
i had chili today and i suppose i will be having the leftovers tomorrow.

YeOldeStonecat
05-13-08, 05:27 PM
:D

Texas Red Chile

No beans, no hamburger....this is the real stuff.

Texas Red Chile recipe...great for those cold winter days

****************************************************

Texas Chile (Texas Red)
Seasoning Mix
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon ground guajillo chile pepper
1 tablespoon ground arbol chile pepper
2 teaspoons dried sweet basil leaves
1 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
***
5 pounds beef top round, cut into .5 inch dice
3 dried ancho or poblano peppers
3 dried arbol peppers or any small, thin hot red chile peppers
6 dried serrano or guajillo peppers
1/2 cup yellow cornmeal
1 1/4 pounds salt pork, Boston pork butt, or bacon, cut into 1/4 inch dice (if you use salt pork..rinse some of the salt from the rind and pat dry)
6 cups chopped onions, in all
6 cups chopped green bell peppers, in all
3 cups chopped celery, in all
2 tablespoons minced fresh garlic
4 bay leaves
6 cups beef (preferred), pork, or chicken stock, in all
8 medium fresh tomatoes, peeled and smashed, with their juices
1 tablespoon ground cumin
***

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees
Combine the seasoning mix ingredients thoroughly in a small bowl. Makes 6 tablespoons plus 2 1/2 teaspoons
Sprinkle 1/4 cup of the seasoning mix all over the meat and work it in well with your hands.
Place the dried anchos, arbols, and serranos--or whatever chili peppers you were able to find---on a baking pan and dry then in the oven until brittle, about 10 to 13 minutes. Let cool. When the peppers are cool enough to handle, crush them with your hands into the bowl of a food processor and blend into a find powder. There should be about 7 tablespoons in all.
Place the cornmeal in a small skillet over medium-high heat and toast, flippin the cornmeal and shaking the skillet constantly, until the cornmeal is light brown, about 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.
Place the salt pokr, pork butt, or bacon in a large heavy pot over medium heat. Cover and cook, uncovering the pot occasionally to scrape the bottom, until the salt pork is a deep brown color, about 30 minutes. There should be a fiml on the bottom of the pot that looks like ground red pepper. Remove the salt pork from the pot with a slotted spoon and set aside.
Turn the heat up to high, and when the fat remaining in the pot is hot, add half the beef to the pot. Cook, turning once or twice, until browned, about 5 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon to a bowl. Then brown the remaining beef and remove to the bowl.
Add 4 cups each of the onions and bell peppers, 2 cups of the celery, the garlic, and the remaining seasoning mix to the pot. Stir well, cover, and cook 8 to 10 minutes. Add the bay leaves, cover, and cook, uncovering occasionall yto stir, about 15 minutes. Remove the lid and cook until the vegetables are sticking to the bottom of the pot, about 6 minutes. Stir in the ground peppers and the browned beef. Cook unit the meat sticks hard and forms a hard crust on the bottom of the pot, about 20 to 25 minutes.
meanwhile place the browned salt pork and 1 cup of the stock in the container of a blender, and process until thoroughly blended.

When the meat has formed a crust on the bottom of the pot, stir in the salt pork/stock mixture and scrape the bottom of the pot. Add the tomatoes, the remaining 2 cups ionions, 2 cups bell peppers, 1 cup celery, and 1 cup of the stock. Scrape the bottom of the pot well and cook, uncovered, 12 minutes. Cover the pot and cook over high heat 8 mintues. Add the toasted cornmeal and 1 cup more stock to the pot and scrap the bottom. Stir in the remaining 3 cups stock and the cumin. Bring to a boil, cover, lower the heat, and simmer, scraping occasionally if the mixture starts to stick, about 1 hour and 10 minutes. Remove from the heat. makes about 18 cups.

Serve immediately or refrigerate overnight and rehat before serving. Fantastic with corn tortillas.

Note:These are the chile peppers we used. You can use whatever is available in your area, whole dried or ground, but be sure to buy pure ground chile peppers, not commercial chili powder.

***

Recipe taken from Chef Paul Prudhomme's "Seasoned America" cookbook...this is one of my fave cookbooks, one of my fave cooks!

Shinobi
05-13-08, 06:35 PM
Whiskey. :nod::thumb:

9mmprincess
05-13-08, 10:24 PM
:D

Texas Red Chile

No beans, no hamburger....this is the real stuff.

Texas Red Chile recipe...great for those cold winter days

****************************************************

Texas Chile (Texas Red)
Seasoning Mix
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon ground guajillo chile pepper
1 tablespoon ground arbol chile pepper
2 teaspoons dried sweet basil leaves
1 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
***
5 pounds beef top round, cut into .5 inch dice
3 dried ancho or poblano peppers
3 dried arbol peppers or any small, thin hot red chile peppers
6 dried serrano or guajillo peppers
1/2 cup yellow cornmeal
1 1/4 pounds salt pork, Boston pork butt, or bacon, cut into 1/4 inch dice (if you use salt pork..rinse some of the salt from the rind and pat dry)
6 cups chopped onions, in all
6 cups chopped green bell peppers, in all
3 cups chopped celery, in all
2 tablespoons minced fresh garlic
4 bay leaves
6 cups beef (preferred), pork, or chicken stock, in all
8 medium fresh tomatoes, peeled and smashed, with their juices
1 tablespoon ground cumin
***

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees
Combine the seasoning mix ingredients thoroughly in a small bowl. Makes 6 tablespoons plus 2 1/2 teaspoons
Sprinkle 1/4 cup of the seasoning mix all over the meat and work it in well with your hands.
Place the dried anchos, arbols, and serranos--or whatever chili peppers you were able to find---on a baking pan and dry then in the oven until brittle, about 10 to 13 minutes. Let cool. When the peppers are cool enough to handle, crush them with your hands into the bowl of a food processor and blend into a find powder. There should be about 7 tablespoons in all.
Place the cornmeal in a small skillet over medium-high heat and toast, flippin the cornmeal and shaking the skillet constantly, until the cornmeal is light brown, about 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.
Place the salt pokr, pork butt, or bacon in a large heavy pot over medium heat. Cover and cook, uncovering the pot occasionally to scrape the bottom, until the salt pork is a deep brown color, about 30 minutes. There should be a fiml on the bottom of the pot that looks like ground red pepper. Remove the salt pork from the pot with a slotted spoon and set aside.
Turn the heat up to high, and when the fat remaining in the pot is hot, add half the beef to the pot. Cook, turning once or twice, until browned, about 5 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon to a bowl. Then brown the remaining beef and remove to the bowl.
Add 4 cups each of the onions and bell peppers, 2 cups of the celery, the garlic, and the remaining seasoning mix to the pot. Stir well, cover, and cook 8 to 10 minutes. Add the bay leaves, cover, and cook, uncovering occasionall yto stir, about 15 minutes. Remove the lid and cook until the vegetables are sticking to the bottom of the pot, about 6 minutes. Stir in the ground peppers and the browned beef. Cook unit the meat sticks hard and forms a hard crust on the bottom of the pot, about 20 to 25 minutes.
meanwhile place the browned salt pork and 1 cup of the stock in the container of a blender, and process until thoroughly blended.

When the meat has formed a crust on the bottom of the pot, stir in the salt pork/stock mixture and scrape the bottom of the pot. Add the tomatoes, the remaining 2 cups ionions, 2 cups bell peppers, 1 cup celery, and 1 cup of the stock. Scrape the bottom of the pot well and cook, uncovered, 12 minutes. Cover the pot and cook over high heat 8 mintues. Add the toasted cornmeal and 1 cup more stock to the pot and scrap the bottom. Stir in the remaining 3 cups stock and the cumin. Bring to a boil, cover, lower the heat, and simmer, scraping occasionally if the mixture starts to stick, about 1 hour and 10 minutes. Remove from the heat. makes about 18 cups.

Serve immediately or refrigerate overnight and rehat before serving. Fantastic with corn tortillas.

Note:These are the chile peppers we used. You can use whatever is available in your area, whole dried or ground, but be sure to buy pure ground chile peppers, not commercial chili powder.

***

Recipe taken from Chef Paul Prudhomme's "Seasoned America" cookbook...this is one of my fave cookbooks, one of my fave cooks!

oh man, that sounds good. I want some chilli now.

ghost
05-14-08, 01:11 PM
Thicken with masa flour.

brembo
05-14-08, 01:59 PM
Congealed eel farts. Hard to get, but work great.

9mmprincess
05-14-08, 11:36 PM
Congealed eel farts. Hard to get, but work great.

no wonder you have 17,000 posts.

brembo
05-14-08, 11:41 PM
no wonder you have 17,000 posts.

Snarky tonight huh? Also, look at my join date.

It's an homage to SNL.

sito
05-15-08, 12:09 AM
tomato paste

Same and slow cook it to "burn" off the water.

sito
05-15-08, 12:11 AM
Snarky tonight huh? Also, look at my join date.

It's an homage to SNL.

Brembo adds spam to thicken his chili.

YeOldeStonecat
10-11-08, 10:02 AM
Making the above recipe today, contest tomorrow.

Also at the contest....the hot pepper eating contest...I hope to hold onto the trophe for the 3rd year in a row. b

Roody
10-11-08, 10:27 AM
Making the above recipe today, contest tomorrow.

Also at the contest....the hot pepper eating contest...I hope to hold onto the trophe for the 3rd year in a row. b

Dude your house is going to be rank after you finish that pepper eating contest. :eek:

YeOldeStonecat
10-11-08, 11:39 AM
Hot peppers don't seem to bother me in that way...I don't tend to "rip 'em" afterwards.

The next morning...on the hoops, the ol' red eye..yes, and the first couple of pees that morning will feel like boiling turpentine going out. But no gassing out the house.

YeOldeStonecat
10-11-08, 11:39 AM
Of course if I enjoy a few dozen bowls of everyones chile for the chile contest..yeah...the house will have a warm haze about it. :D

YeOldeStonecat
10-11-08, 12:47 PM
http://www.worth1000.com/entries/402000/402306qWYv_w.jpg

YeOldeStonecat
10-11-08, 05:28 PM
4 hours later...the big pot of chile is done...she's simmering now, the cubes of beef round are tenderizing.

JC
10-11-08, 06:18 PM
:D

Texas Red Chile

No beans, no hamburger....this is the real stuff.

Texas Red Chile recipe...great for those cold winter days

****************************************************

Texas Chile (Texas Red)
Seasoning Mix
1 tablespoon salt
1 tablespoon ground guajillo chile pepper
1 tablespoon ground arbol chile pepper
2 teaspoons dried sweet basil leaves
1 1/2 teaspoons garlic powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
1 teaspoon paprika
1 teaspoon black pepper
1 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon dry mustard
1 teaspoon dried thyme leaves
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
***
5 pounds beef top round, cut into .5 inch dice
3 dried ancho or poblano peppers
3 dried arbol peppers or any small, thin hot red chile peppers
6 dried serrano or guajillo peppers
1/2 cup yellow cornmeal
1 1/4 pounds salt pork, Boston pork butt, or bacon, cut into 1/4 inch dice (if you use salt pork..rinse some of the salt from the rind and pat dry)
6 cups chopped onions, in all
6 cups chopped green bell peppers, in all
3 cups chopped celery, in all
2 tablespoons minced fresh garlic
4 bay leaves
6 cups beef (preferred), pork, or chicken stock, in all
8 medium fresh tomatoes, peeled and smashed, with their juices
1 tablespoon ground cumin
***

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees
Combine the seasoning mix ingredients thoroughly in a small bowl. Makes 6 tablespoons plus 2 1/2 teaspoons
Sprinkle 1/4 cup of the seasoning mix all over the meat and work it in well with your hands.
Place the dried anchos, arbols, and serranos--or whatever chili peppers you were able to find---on a baking pan and dry then in the oven until brittle, about 10 to 13 minutes. Let cool. When the peppers are cool enough to handle, crush them with your hands into the bowl of a food processor and blend into a find powder. There should be about 7 tablespoons in all.
Place the cornmeal in a small skillet over medium-high heat and toast, flippin the cornmeal and shaking the skillet constantly, until the cornmeal is light brown, about 4 minutes. Remove from the heat and set aside.
Place the salt pokr, pork butt, or bacon in a large heavy pot over medium heat. Cover and cook, uncovering the pot occasionally to scrape the bottom, until the salt pork is a deep brown color, about 30 minutes. There should be a fiml on the bottom of the pot that looks like ground red pepper. Remove the salt pork from the pot with a slotted spoon and set aside.
Turn the heat up to high, and when the fat remaining in the pot is hot, add half the beef to the pot. Cook, turning once or twice, until browned, about 5 minutes. Remove with a slotted spoon to a bowl. Then brown the remaining beef and remove to the bowl.
Add 4 cups each of the onions and bell peppers, 2 cups of the celery, the garlic, and the remaining seasoning mix to the pot. Stir well, cover, and cook 8 to 10 minutes. Add the bay leaves, cover, and cook, uncovering occasionall yto stir, about 15 minutes. Remove the lid and cook until the vegetables are sticking to the bottom of the pot, about 6 minutes. Stir in the ground peppers and the browned beef. Cook unit the meat sticks hard and forms a hard crust on the bottom of the pot, about 20 to 25 minutes.
meanwhile place the browned salt pork and 1 cup of the stock in the container of a blender, and process until thoroughly blended.

When the meat has formed a crust on the bottom of the pot, stir in the salt pork/stock mixture and scrape the bottom of the pot. Add the tomatoes, the remaining 2 cups ionions, 2 cups bell peppers, 1 cup celery, and 1 cup of the stock. Scrape the bottom of the pot well and cook, uncovered, 12 minutes. Cover the pot and cook over high heat 8 mintues. Add the toasted cornmeal and 1 cup more stock to the pot and scrap the bottom. Stir in the remaining 3 cups stock and the cumin. Bring to a boil, cover, lower the heat, and simmer, scraping occasionally if the mixture starts to stick, about 1 hour and 10 minutes. Remove from the heat. makes about 18 cups.

Serve immediately or refrigerate overnight and rehat before serving. Fantastic with corn tortillas.

Note:These are the chile peppers we used. You can use whatever is available in your area, whole dried or ground, but be sure to buy pure ground chile peppers, not commercial chili powder.

***

Recipe taken from Chef Paul Prudhomme's "Seasoned America" cookbook...this is one of my fave cookbooks, one of my fave cooks!


How many does this serve?
What would you recommend for a family of 4 (and leftovers of course)
maybe 1/4 the recipe?

I have about 15 lbs of smoked boston butt in the freezer. I need to use some of it.

Lefty
10-11-08, 06:24 PM
How many does this serve?
What would you recommend for a family of 4 (and leftovers of course)
maybe 1/4 the recipe?

I have about 15 lbs of smoked boston butt in the freezer. I need to use some of it.

Five pounds of beef should feed 15 people once if you consider 1/3 pound of meat per serving.

YeOldeStonecat
10-11-08, 07:08 PM
How many does this serve?
What would you recommend for a family of 4 (and leftovers of course)
maybe 1/4 the recipe?

I have about 15 lbs of smoked boston butt in the freezer. I need to use some of it.

Oh you'll have enough for 3 nights of dinners.
Your stomach and butt won't want it 3 nights in a row though...

...or your noses. :D

YeOldeStonecat
10-14-08, 10:19 AM
With some very slight alterations of the above recipe...it won the contest! :D

I took a hint from Chef Emeril...and put a liiiittle bit of dark chocolate in it. And a small handful of shredded taco cheese.

Humboldt
10-14-08, 10:25 AM
depends on who's going to be eating it:wth:

Ken
10-14-08, 11:42 AM
Butt...? Eatin' butt... :wth:


Kobe, tell me how my a$$ tastes... [/Shaq] :D

I wish that I possessed the skill, patience, talent and creativity in the kitchen that some of you guys have...

Someone point me in the direction of a good, close restaurant, stat!

downhill
10-14-08, 07:37 PM
6 dried serrano or guajillo peppers


Yes....want to cool it down a little? Use jalapenos. Them serrano's are hotter than a popcorn fart. I use three to a pot about that big and every one still complains. lol

How come dried?

Debbie
10-14-08, 08:06 PM
My church is having a Chili cook-off this saturday. Good thing it's outside. http://www.tkzm.net/images/smilies/fart.gif


:insert MadDocs tale of the Texas Chile Cook off, then run, far and fast: :D


/lurking/

/farting/


I guess you aren't sheepish about farting eh? :D


When Ken finishes a big helping of chili... the "force" is something to fear!!!!!!


Congealed eel farts. Hard to get, but work great.


Dude your house is going to be rank after you finish that pepper eating contest. :eek:


Of course if I enjoy a few dozen bowls of everyones chile for the chile contest..yeah...the house will have a warm haze about it. :D

I just laughed so hard reading this, I farted myself! :rotfl::rotfl::rotfl::rotfl: You guys are a trip! :rotfl:

Debbie
10-14-08, 08:07 PM
Them serrano's are hotter than a popcorn fart.



OMG :rotfl::rotfl::rotfl:

brembo
10-14-08, 08:18 PM
I think 9mm Princess has an issue with me.

Humboldt
10-15-08, 12:08 AM
I think 9mm Princess has an issue with me.

Everyone has an issue with you.

Ya damn tease.

YeOldeStonecat
10-15-08, 07:12 AM
How come dried?

I'll guess a few reasons.
One is, perhaps it's more authentic. Being an authentic texas red recipe, I'm thinking he's going after a more authentic ingredients list....stuff that the chuckwagon cook was more apt to have on the trail. Dried foods were more common for the ride.

Second reason, more likely to find various dried chiles on the market around the whole US, versus fresh. Especially up north here.

Third...dried peppers take on an entirely different flavor versus their fresh counterparts. You'll get a much richer, smokier flavor. Dried peppers are much better as a spice. With fresh peppers you'll usually have the flavor accompanied by a "soapy" flavor. Even if you're careful in preparation and you scrape out the white lining inside. It's that inside white rib lining that actually makes me gag more when eating the whole fresh peppers in the pepper eating contest...not only does it have the highest percentage of the heat, but it's really nasty tasting with that soap bar flavor.

I've made this a few times without actually getting the exact peppers in his list, it's hard to find those even dried up here. I've substituted many times. Chef Paul is a cook that preached "layering" for flavors. The layering used in a couple of different concepts. One...is using several variations of one spice or ingredient..to get a varied and much richer flavor. The other more important part of his layering approach in cooking, is to put the ingredients in in stages. Put some in..cook...add some more...cook...add some more...cook. Ingredients take on different flavors depending on how long they've been cooked. His end result is a wide mixture of flavors..because they ingredients are all presented in the dish with different stages of cooking.

downhill
10-15-08, 08:41 AM
Good to know. Thanks for the response, YeOld..

tHE_0ne
11-05-09, 04:50 PM
this NEEDS a bump for all you flu people

Sava700
11-05-09, 05:48 PM
this NEEDS a bump for all you flu people

Good thread... more beans, burger and mushrooms to thicken mine up.


But a little offtopic..gotta love the tags for this thread. :rolleyes: :wth:

http://members.speedguide.net/sava700/chillitags.jpg

YeOldeStonecat
11-05-09, 05:48 PM
Good timing...having Chile tonight! :D