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lighter
04-06-01, 10:07 PM
My friend told me to do this..

Under command prompt, and then type tracert xx.xx.xx.xx (ip) or tracert www.myisp.com (http://www.myisp.com) (dns)....

U will see all the routes it goes thru to reach the destination.

I got a list of numbers but i dont understand what they means, can anyone teach me?

JamieLee2k
04-07-01, 12:43 AM
seems all you want to do is hack someone. you can get into a lot of trouble if the person you are hacking decides to grass you up. I wouldn't touch it.

lighter
04-07-01, 01:08 AM
You got me wrong. The one who recommend me to use tracert is because I experience very slow access with my ISP, but he ask my to use tracert to see which backbone my ISP is using, and hence, can know which servers are down and so on...


Originally posted by JLR:
seems all you want to do is hack someone. you can get into a lot of trouble if the person you are hacking decides to grass you up. I wouldn't touch it.

Prey521
04-07-01, 01:37 AM
Originally posted by JLR:
seems all you want to do is hack someone. you can get into a lot of trouble if the person you are hacking decides to grass you up. I wouldn't touch it.

His question is a legitimate one, it has nothing to do with hacking. If it's not answered by the time I get back, I'll explain it to you Lighter :)

tekelberry
04-07-01, 01:55 AM
Originally posted by JLR:
seems all you want to do is hack someone. you can get into a lot of trouble if the person you are hacking decides to grass you up. I wouldn't touch it.

what the hell are you talking about?!?
tracerts have nothing to do with hacking

hello
04-07-01, 02:09 AM
LOL
I don't see where hacking comes into checking ones route to a destination on the 'net.

To keep this simple, the #'s you see are "ping" times, which as you can tell by the name, the amount of time in milliseconds the router or server takes to respond to a chunk of data you have sent it.

In most cases, if you're on a dialup connection, you'll average around 100-150 ms to your first few hops and bounce up to 150-300 to most destinations. In between if you're seeing abnormaly high #'s, you can tell the exact point where the lag is occuring. this really isn't that helpful in most cases, because it is your ISP's routing services which are causing the slowdown, rather than your hardware...or perhaps even your phoneline.

ghost
04-07-01, 02:29 AM
From the Microsoft site, FYI:

How the TRACERT Command Works

The TRACERT diagnostic utility determines the route taken to a destination by sending Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) echo packets with varying IP Time-To-Live (TTL) values to the destination. Each router along the path is required to decrement the TTL on a packet by at least 1 before forwarding it, so the TTL is effectively a hop count. When the TTL on a packet reaches 0, the router should send an ICMP Time Exceeded message back to the source computer.

TRACERT determines the route by sending the first echo packet with a TTL of 1 and incrementing the TTL by 1 on each subsequent transmission until the target responds or the maximum TTL is reached. The route is determined by examining the ICMP Time Exceeded messages sent back by intermediate routers. Note that some routers silently drop packets with expired TTLs and are invisible to TRACERT.

TRACERT prints out an ordered list of the routers in the path that returned the ICMP Time Exceeded message. If the -d switch is used (telling TRACERT not to perform a DNS lookup on each IP address), the IP address of the near- side interface of the routers is reported.

In the following example, the packet must travel through two routers (157.54.48.1 and 11.1.0.67) to get to host 11.1.0.1. In this example, the default gateway is 157.54.48.1 and the IP address of the router on the 11.1.0.0 network is at 11.1.0.67.

C:\>tracert 11.1.0.1

Tracing route to 11.1.0.1 over a maximum of 30 hops

1 2 ms 3 ms 2 ms 157.54.48.1
2 75 ms 83 ms 88 ms 11.1.0.67
3 73 ms 79 ms 93 ms 11.1.0.1

Trace complete.


Troubleshooting with TRACERT

The TRACERT command can be used to determine where a packet stopped on the network. In the following example, the default gateway has determined that there is not a valid path for the host on 22.110.0.1. There is probably a router configuration problem or the 22.110.0.0 network does not exist (a bad IP address).

C:\>tracert 22.110.0.1

Tracing route to 22.110.0.1 over a maximum of 30 hops

1 157.54.48.1 reports: Destination net unreachable.

Trace complete.


TRACERT is useful for troubleshooting large networks where several paths can be taken to arrive at the same point, or where many intermediate systems (routers or bridges) are involved.


TRACERT syntax

There are several command-line switches that can be used with TRACERT, but they are usually not needed for standard troubleshooting.

TRACERT syntax:

tracert [-d] [-h maximum_hops] [-j host-list] [-w timeout] target_name

Parameters:

-d
Specifies to not resolve addresses to host names.

-h maximum_hops
Specifies the maximum number of hops to search for target.

-j host-list
Specifies loose source route along the host-list.

-w timeout
Waits the number of milliseconds specified by timeout for each
reply.

target_name
Name or IP address of the target host.


ghost

[ 04-07-2001: Message edited by: ghost ]

JamieLee2k
04-07-01, 03:36 AM
yeah yeah my mistake I had just got up and I red it wrong I thought it said Telnet my mistake I know the difference sorry again

Duzmor
04-07-01, 06:29 AM
What does it mean when the tracert says
"time out"
Thanks
Duzmor :D :D

lighter
04-07-01, 03:27 PM
Thanks everyone for your speedy replies. I've got another good link here on Tracerts, just to share with you nice pple.
http://cne.gsfc.nasa.gov/tcpipsvcs/netwkutil/traceroutetutorial.html

tekelberry
04-08-01, 12:33 AM
it means that that router is blocking requests and/or the router isnt responsing and is down or it is too slow